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Aldous Huxley Quotes

After silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music

There is no substitute for talent. Industry and all the virtues are of no avail.

The history of any nation follows an undulatory course. In the trough of the wave we find more or less complete anarchy; but the crest is not more or less complete Utopia, but only, at best, a tolerably humane, partially free and fairly just society that invariably carries within itself the seeds of its own decadence.

Man is an intelligence, not served by, but in servitude to his organs.

Experience is not what happens to a man. It is what a man does with what happens to him.

Silence is as full of potential wisdom and wit as the unshown marble of great sculpture. The silent bear no witness against themselves.

There are confessable agonies, sufferings of which one can positively be proud. Of bereavement, of parting, of the sense of sin and the fear of death the poets have eloquently spoken. They command the world's sympathy. But there are also discreditable anguishes, no less excruciating than the others, but of which the sufferer dare not, cannot speak. The anguish of thwarted desire, for example.

I can sympathize with people's pains, but not with their pleasures. There is something curiously boring about somebody else's happiness.

Every man's memory is his private literature.

Most vices demand considerable self-sacrifices. There is no greater mistake than to suppose that a vicious life is a life of uninterrupted pleasure. It is a life almost as wearisome and painful -- if strenuously led -- as Christian's in The Pilgrim's Progress.

It is the customary fate of new truths to begin as heresies and to end as superstitions.

But a priest's life is not supposed to be well-rounded; it is supposed to be one-pointed -- a compass, not a weathercock.

Experience teaches only the teachable.

Facts don't cease to exist because they are ignored.

Experience teaches only the teachable.